Ouroboros223

Oud Beginner
This is one of the best summaries i have read on the description of barn. So often in the online oudh community the discussion on what is barn is side tracked by the 'auxiliary' smoke screen that the real smell-to-term relationship is lost. You hit the nail on the head with this sentence "The fragrance that this term refers to is very complex and multifaceted and varies greatly from one source to another." There are a myriad of barns in the scent world and a decent variety of them in the oudh species as well.

The complexity of it is why many associate it with the closest smell they know, rather than having the ability to split the nuances that make the barn category. The barn note is inherent to a few of the oudh species and it is not the same as the rotten sock smell of bad soaking practice.
Very true, cambodi "barn" is nothing like Indian "barn" and bhutan while having many "barnyard" facets is in a ball game of its own. Yet they all shares similarities, they have stark differences based on region.
 

Faris

Oud Fan
I’m quite familiar with Barnyard because I live in India & maybe that’s why I like it. India being an agriculturally dominant country, it is a common smell in the country side.

You will find a slight barn around pastures and a strong one where the the domestic animals are kept. People here use cow dung for various purposes & you can distinctively smell the barn if you go close to the cow dung & animal shelter environment. Even horse stables will give you a distinctive barn smell.

Describing the smell, it is somewhat a strong salty, fertilised ground-like smell. Barn might also constitute to the smell you might get after stroking the body of a cow or goat. Their natural body odour being salty, slightly urea-like.

The barn smell can be both, dry (crisp/mellow, hay like) and wet (good way dirty, animalic).
The hay smell is like dry grass in the scorching sun.
Perhaps (and maybe) one can tell (by the smell of barn) how the wood was soaked.

Even the leather smell is quite common in India as it is a major exporter of finished and unfinished leather. They leather we usually smell in strong Hindis (due to fermentation) is that of chrome/chemical tanned leather. Vegetable/natural tanned leather is quite pleasant in smell.
 

SULAYM

Artisan
Barnyard notes, reminiscent of earth, leather, and the untamed outdoors, connect us to nature and its primal essence. They evoke a sense of authenticity and grounding, offering a fragrance experience that is raw and unfiltered. For those who wear it, these scents are a bold statement, a celebration of the natural world in all its unrefined glory. The classic Hindi profile is characterised and revered for this very reason.

Indolic notes, found in rich, fragrant white flowers like jasmine and tuberose @Aftab, offer a dance between the delicate and the potent. These scents are deep, sensual, and carry a hint of mystery, creating a fragrance experience that is as intriguing as it is captivating.

So, why the allure? These unique notes provide a fragrance journey that is rich in complexity and depth. They stand as a refreshing departure from the typical, often overly sweet, synthetic fragrances that dominate the market. Instead, they offer a multi-layered olfactory experience, changing and evolving over time, revealing different facets of their character.

Moreover, choosing a fragrance that features barnyard or indolic notes is a bold move, a step off the beaten path that reflects a deep appreciation for oud. It is a choice for the adventurous, for those who seek out the unique and value the unconventional.

I really enjoy when customers share how wearing barny Hindi oud makes them feel truly masculine and full of confidence but they keep it for special occasions (it can’t really be worn in the office). I remember one customer telling me he wore Bandarban (one of our best sellers) to a crucial business meeting where it was vital for him to assert dominance. He shared how the scent played a significant role in helping him gain the upper hand in the situation.
 

Faris

Oud Fan
Barnyard notes, reminiscent of earth, leather, and the untamed outdoors, connect us to nature and its primal essence. They evoke a sense of authenticity and grounding, offering a fragrance experience that is raw and unfiltered. For those who wear it, these scents are a bold statement, a celebration of the natural world in all its unrefined glory. The classic Hindi profile is characterised and revered for this very reason.

Indolic notes, found in rich, fragrant white flowers like jasmine and tuberose @Aftab, offer a dance between the delicate and the potent. These scents are deep, sensual, and carry a hint of mystery, creating a fragrance experience that is as intriguing as it is captivating.

So, why the allure? These unique notes provide a fragrance journey that is rich in complexity and depth. They stand as a refreshing departure from the typical, often overly sweet, synthetic fragrances that dominate the market. Instead, they offer a multi-layered olfactory experience, changing and evolving over time, revealing different facets of their character.

Moreover, choosing a fragrance that features barnyard or indolic notes is a bold move, a step off the beaten path that reflects a deep appreciation for oud. It is a choice for the adventurous, for those who seek out the unique and value the unconventional.

I really enjoy when customers share how wearing barny Hindi oud makes them feel truly masculine and full of confidence but they keep it for special occasions (it can’t really be worn in the office). I remember one customer telling me he wore Bandarban (one of our best sellers) to a crucial business meeting where it was vital for him to assert dominance. He shared how the scent played a significant role in helping him gain the upper hand in the situation.
I agree brother, scent can definitely affect the way you feel & therefore, affect they way you act & perform. It’s like wearing a suit or a leather jacket i.e a confidence booster.
 

Faris

Oud Fan
Barnyard notes, reminiscent of earth, leather, and the untamed outdoors, connect us to nature and its primal essence. They evoke a sense of authenticity and grounding, offering a fragrance experience that is raw and unfiltered. For those who wear it, these scents are a bold statement, a celebration of the natural world in all its unrefined glory. The classic Hindi profile is characterised and revered for this very reason.

Indolic notes, found in rich, fragrant white flowers like jasmine and tuberose @Aftab, offer a dance between the delicate and the potent. These scents are deep, sensual, and carry a hint of mystery, creating a fragrance experience that is as intriguing as it is captivating.

So, why the allure? These unique notes provide a fragrance journey that is rich in complexity and depth. They stand as a refreshing departure from the typical, often overly sweet, synthetic fragrances that dominate the market. Instead, they offer a multi-layered olfactory experience, changing and evolving over time, revealing different facets of their character.

Moreover, choosing a fragrance that features barnyard or indolic notes is a bold move, a step off the beaten path that reflects a deep appreciation for oud. It is a choice for the adventurous, for those who seek out the unique and value the unconventional.

I really enjoy when customers share how wearing barny Hindi oud makes them feel truly masculine and full of confidence but they keep it for special occasions (it can’t really be worn in the office). I remember one customer telling me he wore Bandarban (one of our best sellers) to a crucial business meeting where it was vital for him to assert dominance. He shared how the scent played a significant role in helping him gain the upper hand in the situation.
Brother, how would you say the barn is achieved in an oil?
Is it achieved by the soaking method or through certain tweaks during distillation or is Barn a region specific thing?

To give some context, I have tried (not bought) 3 oils from the Golaghat (India) region from diff sellers & all had strong, prominent & similar smelling barn.
The strength of their barn is incomparable to the barn I’ve found in other regions like Myanmar (Burma), Bangladesh & even other Hindis (from a diff region) for that matter. So could it be that the trees in Golaghat possess something that favours the strong barn?
Lastly brother, can an artisan produce/obtain strong barn in oils not associated with barn, like a Trat or let’s say a Kalimantan/Merauke oil?
 

Faizal_p

Sulaym.co.uk
I think this has been discussed extensively on other posts over the years but generally speaking the most common form of barn is generated by long soaking in warm countries which encourage fungal and bacterial growth. I've seen many distillers pour the whole barrel into the pot whereas some may scrape off the top before adding to the still.
Taking India for instance everyone's familiar of the barn heavy indolic oils but over the last few years there's been an increase in zero barn oils. We released some amazing oils in the past from Assam which were all zero barn, clean soak.

To caveat this though there are some older oils however which have an intrinsic barn component which comes from the actual decay of the old wood itself. I've come across a few oils from vendors on here as well as our own which exhibit this trait
 

mesOUD

Resident Artisan
Brother, how would you say the barn is achieved in an oil?
Is it achieved by the soaking method or through certain tweaks during distillation or is Barn a region specific thing?

To give some context, I have tried (not bought) 3 oils from the Golaghat (India) region from diff sellers & all had strong, prominent & similar smelling barn.
The strength of their barn is incomparable to the barn I’ve found in other regions like Myanmar (Burma), Bangladesh & even other Hindis (from a diff region) for that matter. So could it be that the trees in Golaghat possess something that favours the strong barn?
Lastly brother, can an artisan produce/obtain strong barn in oils not associated with barn, like a Trat or let’s say a Kalimantan/Merauke oil?
Barn yard topic talked on older posts
Can categorize barn yard like this
1)original barn yard:Aquilaria agallocha:the spice found in india,Bangladesh,include this note naturally,and this is one of the best notes for me
2)with long soaking:normally optimum time of soaking for increasing yield(and this is not a bad thing,this also effect the base notes,not 100% about getting max yield),but some distillers make too long soaking for getting this barn yard effect,also using the soaking water several times,this increase barn yard note,but this is not as good as natural barn yard note for me
3)your question:for other spices,mainly in thailand and cambodia people do this,for replicating indian barn yarn note,they make long soaking,this also shows how popular was indian style barn yard note in old times,now people automatically do it without thinking too much,they learned from their fathers or old distillers,and yes for other spices too,a distiller can add barn hard note with soaking or with distilling technique(high heat)
But these are not like original barn yard note of agallocha spice
 

oudstronaut

True Ouddict
I’m sure by now you know that the barnyard note comes from fermentation of the agarwood prior to distillation. This is mainly done to break down the fibers in the wood and allow more oil to be extracted.

I find the scent from fermented oils to be very complex for the price point they are offered at.

As for the “barnyard notes”. Some oils I’ve tried have been quite fecal/manure-smelling. However, the vast majority smell more sour/funky than outright fecal.

The further I go in this journey the less it is about “smelling clean” and the more it is about “experiencing amazing scents” to me, these fermented oud oils are one way of “experiencing amazing scents”. Nice new gens can do this for me too. But MOST of my favourite oils have at least SOME level of soak.

I realize these types of oils don’t “smell nice” by conventional standards. We tend to care a lot, in the west, about smelling “clean”. I care much less about that as I age. Heck, at this point, I don’t even use deodorant, and I use no scented soaps or detergents. If I’m trying to “smell nice” I just make sure I wash and apply some natural attar before I go out. I’m happy with it and that’s all that matters to me at this point!
 

Goodness Nose

True Ouddict
hi i just wonder why some people like the smell of barn yard?
the Eden Botanicals batch 12 and 14 have perfect barnyard notes. its like sticking your head in a sun baked and steamy pile of cypress mulch. helluva country smell there, and its delightful 😆

a more refined approach being the Malay Premium at mesOUD that comes off much cleaner, and camphorus. its the next one on my 'must have' list


as to WHY i like barnyard... thats a mystery. thats like asking why ambergris or musk is good. just is! maybe its a primal thing lol
 
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Kolalid

True Ouddict
While many find the Barn yard note off putting it is actually the first thing that attracted me to oud haha. The first ouds I smelled were traditional gulf ouds that had a sweet barn to them, and it kept me wanting to go back for more. Such a unique and strange smell that has a level of funk and “dirtiness” to it but is so intriguing. When the barn note is well balanced with other interesting notes in a oud it is truly a thing of beauty.
 
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