Coal Burner Or Electronic?

Discussion in 'General' started by IbnRIbnAAIbnA, Sep 7, 2019.

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  1. IbnRIbnAAIbnA

    IbnRIbnAAIbnA Feeling gOUD

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    Hi guys, which one would you prefer to use and does it make any difference in terms of quality of burning the Oud or Bakhoor?
     
  2. Mr.P

    Mr.P Evoloudtionary Bioudlogist

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    Love the electronic burner for daily use. By far. But each method of enjoying incense is precious in its own way. I like to use a variety, but the convenience, temperature control, and cleanliness of electric burners enables me to enjoy more incense more beautifully and more often! Variable temperature electric “subitism” is the way to go.

    https://www.kyarazen.com/the-kyarazen-subitism-incense-heater/
     
  3. Rai Munir

    Rai Munir Musk Man

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    I have to burn a lot of sandal. Sometimes, I burn a billet to let the scent present everywhere. So, coal is my priority. Or light up the billet and that's all. No need to sit near the burner. I haven't faced any issue regarding temperature.

    Hope, I will develop liking for an electric heater. I think if tiny chips are there, only an electric heater will do.
     
    IbnRIbnAAIbnA likes this.
  4. Grega

    Grega True Ouddict

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    I find coal sufficient. Not messy, when it burns down I just throw it into the fireplace along with the burnt incense/woods on top. Thus no cleaning needed. Temperature control is easy. For oud chips you wait until the charcoal burns enough so that only the center remains black while the rest is ash. You place the chip towards the ashen edge and enjoy minutes of it slowly emitting most wonderful fragrances without any smell of burnt wood.
     
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  5. IbnRIbnAAIbnA

    IbnRIbnAAIbnA Feeling gOUD

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    Thanks for the information. In regards to coal do you let it get white and ashy first? Or do you just heat and and out the sandal on straight away?
     
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  6. Rai Munir

    Rai Munir Musk Man

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    Various options I have.

    Sometimes I put frankincense or mastic that creates a layer on the surface of coal. Then I place granules or powder.

    Mostly I put a big chunk on the ashy coal, not on the red hot coal. And place a piece of Oud on the sandalwood. Sandalwood piece is hard enough to sustain the temperature, but not Oud. So, if sandalwood piece, neither powder nor granules, on the coal doesn't get burnt too easy.

    Senses get developed exercising it again and again. Sometimes, I put two sandalwood pieces at some distance on the coal, and Oudwood on those pieces like a bridge.

    This kind of chunks need temperature to emit aroma.
    15678551045822056912731061053263.jpg
     
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  7. Rai Munir

    Rai Munir Musk Man

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    Coal and Sandalwood and Agarwood. The way I place wood.
    IMG20190824220756.jpg

    Granules and powder sprinkled, but the already placed Agarwood and Sandalwood were not fully consumed yet.

    At this point, I used spoonfuls of Sandal powder.
    IMG20190824221645 (1).jpg
     
  8. Mr.P

    Mr.P Evoloudtionary Bioudlogist

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    Ahhhhh!
     
  9. IbnRIbnAAIbnA

    IbnRIbnAAIbnA Feeling gOUD

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    Respected Rai Munir is really a master of the art.
     
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  10. IbnRIbnAAIbnA

    IbnRIbnAAIbnA Feeling gOUD

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    Does the heat of the coal come through all of these layers?
     
  11. IbnRIbnAAIbnA

    IbnRIbnAAIbnA Feeling gOUD

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    Thanks. Where will I be able to find one or anything similar?
     
  12. Rai Munir

    Rai Munir Musk Man

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    Respected @IbnRIbnAAIbnA
    I'm not even a learner. There is only one thing: I never give up. Years ago I couldn't manage all, and for an electric heater I couldn't develope taste. I had to burn a lot of sandal, so I had no option but coal. With the passage of time I developed such technique that now I can easily manage every thing.

    True nature of oils cannot be known through descriptions. A perfect ratio of ingredients cannot be found via other people's experiences. And how to burn wood cannot be mastered trough other's experiences.

    Do it, and never give up. And you will master it.
     
  13. zakinkazi

    zakinkazi Whats this Oud About?

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    1000% agreed . I have been following you from some time Respected Rai Munir.
    Your every post made me to respect you more. The way you guide people is amazing.
    Buy the way from your posts made me to jump in the musk game.
    May Allah grant you more knowledge and heath. Please keep posting ang guide us through. Jazakallah khyr.
     
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  14. PEARL

    PEARL Guerrilla

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    To answer the question of coal or electric you have to consider what you're heating, size, quality, and purpose.

    Coal: Can do all fragrant material. Large pieces like @Rai Munir showed can go on directly, they need the higher heat to penetrate but I wouldn't do it. For smaller or delicate pieces I use white rice ash (WRA) layered over coal as thick as necessary to lower to desired heat and put material on that. You can ramp WRA on top of coal to make heat zones too. For agarwood, better quality wood can tolerate higher heat without becoming acrid, but will of course heat through faster. For the purpose of generating a lot of smoke for fumigating the higher heat of coal is perfect, as is a properly built subitism heater with variable voltage/current power supply, just make sure pieces aren't too thick.

    Electric: Can do all fragrant material, except pieces that are too thick for its radiating heat to penetrate. Unlike Rai Munir, I'd slice that piece into 4's or more and reload instead of using that at once, IMO more surface area equals better release of fragrant compounds, less heat needed, and less chance of too high heat giving burned smell. Electric is easier, faster, safer, cleaner, less wasteful, less hassle, more predictive, and doesn't have its own scent like many coals. But electric sorely lacks that innate, primal interaction and connection between man and fire, and for me is overall less fulfilling.
     
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  15. pspd

    pspd Whats this Oud About?

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    I tried almost everything. (I'm coming from family background who enjoys burning bahkhoor, agarwood etc.). electric. mica on top coal, modern artisan burner from France ( controlled heat with mica and some kind of wire to heat)

    I can conclude. using coal has more lingering after scent than using both electric/modern burner. But using coal more likely to produce burning smell (unpleasant) in the first few mins.

    sorry my bad English.
     
  16. Hamza H

    Hamza H Oud Fanatic

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    Try shoyeido Japanese incense charcoal

    http://www.shoyeido.com/category/incense-charcoal

    Also on amazon uk and us.
     
  17. Mr.P

    Mr.P Evoloudtionary Bioudlogist

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    My electric gets quite hot.

    05853932-8AD9-4831-BE83-ABABD21020A7.jpeg
     
  18. pspd

    pspd Whats this Oud About?

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    thank you! i might want ot try this soon. although i have quite a lot of stock or square coated silver charcoal..less smell than usual one..
     
  19. pspd

    pspd Whats this Oud About?

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    i can show you my alcohol that ive been using all theses years.. no issue. how i can upload phote here..sorry new to this forum
     
  20. Rahel

    Rahel Resident Artisan

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    For years I've been burning my wood on a coal burner. But in the last few years I've got into electric burners and I find that different types of wood burn at different temperatures. So all types methods are needed, depending the types of wood one has
     

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