EJayB

True Ouddict
Some smell better than the others. Like RK sons has a sour scent in the opening, I do not like, bt few minutes after its smells the way I like it.
I did the same Ejay. Bought some and buying more and stashing them away for future. It will age, I dont have to deal with higher pricing and doubtful qualities I am thinking.
Yes I have tried rksons and thought it was great, slight variations from batch to batch but really nice. AGARWOOD Indonesia ( Muhammad T.) has some great indo sandalwood oil at around $2500 a kg and he is reputable as I have worked on a project in the past with him with outstanding results.
 

Tauhid Shaikh

True Ouddict
Yes I have tried rksons and thought it was great, slight variations from batch to batch but really nice. AGARWOOD Indonesia ( Muhammad T.) has some great indo sandalwood oil at around $2500 a kg and he is reputable as I have worked on a project in the past with him with outstanding results.
I have tried Agarwood Indonesia, good sandalwood oil.
 

William Birch

Oud Fanatic
Litres? That must cost an arm and a leg!!


I love sandalwood oil and this is great information on good quality oils at a great price . I just don’t understand the crazy prices some people will pay for sandalwood oils and wonder which expensive sandalwood oils are just these oils being resold by shady vendors ?
I’m going to buy a few litters and put them away in storage for the future!
 

Dimarion

Oud Beginner
Hello, can I ask about sour scent in sandalwood oil? Because in all 4 variants of lab tested sandalwood oils that I get, I have more or less sour notes, that dissapear later. Personally it is good for me, but some of my clients do not want it and ask for "more classic sandalwood" at affordable price. May be these some sour notes is a part of classic behaviour of genuine sandalwood aroma? Or it is not classic at all? If not, may be exist affordable sandalwood that do not have it?
 

Tauhid Shaikh

True Ouddict
Hello, can I ask about sour scent in sandalwood oil? Because in all 4 variants of lab tested sandalwood oils that I get, I have more or less sour notes, that dissapear later. Personally it is good for me, but some of my clients do not want it and ask for "more classic sandalwood" at affordable price. May be these some sour notes is a part of classic behaviour of genuine sandalwood aroma? Or it is not classic at all? If not, may be exist affordable sandalwood that do not have it?
I will let the experts tell us more about the sour notes.

There are many affordable sandalwood oils out there without the sour notes
 

Mr.P

oud<3er
When sandalwood oil oxidizes at some point it starts to develop a sour / acetic note. I know I don’t have this 100% correct but I believe that over time terpene alcohols like santalol oxidize to form aldehydes and acetates. Like santalol becomes santalAL and santalyl (sp.?) acetate. I believe acetates over will develop a vinegar like tartness - something about the release of acetate groups, maybe? Acetic acid is vinegar…

Is there any chemist here who can iron the wrinkles out of this approximate statement of mine?

In some cases those acetates smell even better than the original alcohols. You can buy something called “vetiverol acetate” which is vetiver oil that has been deliberately transformed.

I wanted to add that this may or may not apply to your oils - not sure if you mean the vinegar-like sour note or something else. I have found sandalwood oil develops the vinegar smell most quickly when stored in bottles that are mostly empty with lots of oxygen exposure.
 
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Dimarion

Oud Beginner
When sandalwood oil oxidizes at some point it starts to develop a sour / acetic note. I know I don’t have this 100% correct but I believe that over time terpene alcohols like santalol oxidize to form aldehydes and acetates. Like santalol becomes santalAL and santalyl (sp.?) acetate. I believe acetates over will develop a vinegar like tartness - something about the release of acetate groups, maybe? Acetic acid is vinegar…

Is there any chemist here who can iron the wrinkles out of this approximate statement of mine?

In some cases those acetates smell even better than the original alcohols. You can buy something called “vetiverol acetate” which is vetiver oil that has been deliberately transformed.

I wanted to add that this may or may not apply to your oils - not sure if you mean the vinegar-like sour note or something else. I have found sandalwood oil develops the vinegar smell most quickly when stored in bottles that are mostly empty with lots of oxygen exposure.
Thank you for explanation. I store sandalwood in 500 ml aluminium bottles in dark cool place. While in big bottles smell seem to improve, but in some small 5 ml bottles smell became vinegar especially micro amounts of oil around cap. After applying to skin this sourness dissapear after some time. I think i should never keep oil in small bottles. I thought that sandalwood oil is not easy to oxidise and aroma will improve anyway.... :( So, now at this point I concluding that it was my mistake and lesson. May be i must keep sandalwood in refregerator like citrus oils? I hope that oil will improve its aromatic notes after some time.
 

Mr.P

oud<3er
It’s not an issue if bottles are kept topped off and threads clean. I recently opened a bottle that sat for 20 years with no air space - no acetate notes whatsoever. It has mellowed a bit but does not smell force oxidized or over oxidized.

I actually think ordinary / basic grades of sandalwood oil become a little more interesting when some of those acetic notes start to develop provided they don’t dominate completely.

The last anecdote I have is I once had a relatively large bottle that I decanted sandalwood out of I believe it was an 8 ounce bottle. I attempted to get the last few drops out but I didn’t do a very thorough job or rinse the container with alcohol or anything like that. When I opened this again about a year later and took a good sniff it had a bite to it, a little bit like smelling vinegar. I rinsed this out with alcohol and that made a nice sandalwood spray. I don’t mind the tartness.
 

Dimarion

Oud Beginner
It’s not an issue if bottles are kept topped off and threads clean. I recently opened a bottle that sat for 20 years with no air space - no acetate notes whatsoever. It has mellowed a bit but does not smell force oxidized or over oxidized.

I actually think ordinary / basic grades of sandalwood oil become a little more interesting when some of those acetic notes start to develop provided they don’t dominate completely.

The last anecdote I have is I once had a relatively large bottle that I decanted sandalwood out of I believe it was an 8 ounce bottle. I attempted to get the last few drops out but I didn’t do a very thorough job or rinse the container with alcohol or anything like that. When I opened this again about a year later and took a good sniff it had a bite to it, a little bit like smelling vinegar. I rinsed this out with alcohol and that made a nice sandalwood spray. I don’t mind the tartness.
I left two small bottles with sandalwood oil with sour or vinegar smell opened in dark dry place for 1 night. After that vinegar smell decreased. In addition one sandalwood oil of freash distillation was noticebly cloudy, after night 1/3 of cloudy dissapear and oil became completly transparent in the upper 1/3 part of the bottle. May be after distillation some little amounts of water remain inside the oil? may be it is water (hydrosol) contain something with vinegar smell and it evaporating together with water? may be microdrops of hydrosol in oil contain some molecules of organic material from sandalwood that oxidised very fast and give vinegar acetic smell and this molecules easily evaporates together with water?
 

Mr.P

oud<3er
I don’t know, but the rapid settling of material in your oil is odd - not anything I have seen before.

Are these oils from someone with a good reputation and track record with authentic sandalwood?
 

Dimarion

Oud Beginner
I don’t know, but the rapid settling of material in your oil is odd - not anything I have seen before.

Are these oils from someone with a good reputation and track record with authentic sandalwood?
It is rksons oil and indonesian oil (wich was cloudy). I tested these oil, and reports showed its genuine according to santalols content. in both oils appear vinegar smell and then dissappear after i let them stay without caps
 

Dimarion

Oud Beginner
I found one reason of the sour smell - it was plastic caps that i used for 5 ml-glass bottles. When sandalwood oil contacting with that plastic cap smell became more sour/acidic after some weeks. I need to find better quaility plastic caps. Also I am not sure about terms I use to describe sour smell of the oil, because it is subtle and more close to skim milk than to vingar.
Anyway the smell improved in all variants of sandalwood after removing cap and "breathing of oil".

May i ask anyone to show me if possible photos of genuine sandalwood blocks, to see how looks its texture and color? I saw yellow variants, more dark brown or slightly reddish variants. Is color variations appear due to different oil content in the wood or it is more related to climate/soil variations? Really appreciate you help.
 

Relitaliano

Oud Beginner
Can anyone tell me if MYSORE SANDAL from ML RAMNARAIN is natural Sandalwood or Synthetic? I usually apply on pulse points or Third Eye for a cooling effect during Summer
 

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